COUNTRY GUIDES: Germany

COUNTRY GUIDES: Germany

Want to fall in love with Germany? From traditional dishes to the more unexpected, here's how to do it according to four experts.

December 16, 2019
COUNTRY GUIDES: Germany

COUNTRY GUIDES: Germany

Want to fall in love with Germany? From traditional dishes to the more unexpected, here's how to do it according to four experts.

December 16, 2019
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COUNTRY GUIDES: Germany

 

By Kristen Hawley | Image © GNTB / Francesco Carovillano

Germany is a vast country, and you definitely don’t want to go in without an eating plan. There are things you’ve heard about–Riesling, bratwurst—and then there’s the rest. And the rest offers a stunning amount of amazing options with idyllic scenery to boot. Vibrant cities, towns full of culture and history, and stunning natural vistas from the Alps to the coast are calling. There’s so much to do, in fact, that you might need a little expert advice. Lucky for you, we got four of ‘em, each with their own unique ties to Germany. Read on to find their thoughts on where to try the best wine, traditional dishes, and sample some of the finer, yet accessible luxe dining spots.

And maybe a little bit of the unexpected.

Or, as Brittanny Anderson dubs them, “The cool places I love that aren’t traditionally German but have to include.” In Munich, two non-traditional drinking spots: Die Goldene Bar is a “crazy beautiful cocktail bar in an art museum.” It’s also an all-day cafe. Pull up a chair start with a coffee, continue with a glass of wine, finish with a cocktail. On trend. 

Munich isn’t hurting for great beer, but craft beer is trickier to come by. Centuries-old laws protect the city’s six traditional breweries, craft options are springing up. Anderson recommends Ambar for its fun crowd, Neapolitan-style food (pizza!) and a “really neat beer selection” which sounds exactly like the right kind of place to spend a Friday night. 

Speaking of modern brewing, Anderson also recommends heading north to Freigeist in Cologne. “Freigeist makes crazy modern German beer,” she says. “It is very cool and rivals some of the best American craft beer.” She likes it so much, she sells it in her restaurants. While you’re there, Michael Gulotta says to seek out Himmel un Ääd: a dish of smashed potatoes with pureed apple, griddled bacon and onions, and sometimes blood sausage. Or try Hämmche, which is brined pork hock, roasted and served over sauerkraut.

Finally, pan-Asian in the Mosel — a wine region known for its Riesling— is a natural. Get yours at Yong Yong in Trier. The best part, Anderson says, is that the chef-owner is friendly with all of the local wine producers, which means “amazing local Riesling and a very modern, design-y space.” 

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