Compliments of the Chef with Ryan Farr

Compliments of the Chef with Ryan Farr

This week, Chefs Feed met up with renowned chef Farr at his butcher shop in the Mission.

December 6, 2013
CF: I'm best known for my _______ but I can make one hell of a _______. 
RF: barbecue and smoking; kitchen sink salad 

CF: A few words your sous chef would use to describe you. 
RF: Tough but with a smile. 

CF: What are you working on right now that you are excited about? 
RF: I'm excited about the 4505 Meats Butcher Shop, where we get to spend time with our customers and educate them on cooking methods and different styles of cuts, which we couldn't do at the farmer's market since it's so busy and rushed. We walk them through their lunch or dinner plans and season their meats for them, so all they have to do is cook. We're also going through a lot of different animals and working with new farmers, so it's been fun getting ready for summer. 

CF: Which chef would you drop everything to stage with? 
RF: It sounds cheesy, but it would probably be my grandpa. He was the one who got me into food. Growing up, he would wake me up at 5am and we'd go to all these restaurants that he liked in St. Louis and New Orleans. We would just eat all day. 

CF: Insider tip from the kitchen for diners. 
RF: It's important to let steak temper for an hour before cooking. Cook it in the oven on low heat to whatever internal temperature you want—rare, medium rare, etc.—then sear it. It sounds backwards for most, but if you go low and slow in the oven from the beginning, you will have minimal juices pouring out of the meat, keeping it pink from top to bottom and super tender before searing. 

CF: Message to professional food critics. 
RF: Although they're important and I stress about their reviews like everyone else, critics are there to critique, and their reviews should never dictate what a chef or restaurant owner decides. 

CF: One piece of advice for aspiring young chefs. 
RF: Always leave the kitchen fat and full—eat everything. You can't cook unless you know what your food tastes like.